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Red Porsche 911 Turbo S coupe in mountain setting

While Porsche competes in the realm of super-fast electric vehicles with its Taycan Turbo S, that battery-electric car doesn’t have a turbo, or even an engine, for that matter. But it does have a sibling in the Porsche family with a 640-horsepower twin-turbo engine for real: the 911 Turbo S. Boosted with even more power two years ago, the 911 Turbo S delivers breathtaking acceleration, tenacious road-and-track handling, and top luxury in coupe and Cabriolet (convertible) styles, starting around $230,000.

Green Lamborghini Revuelto on road left front

While EVs may grab headlines with their acceleration performance, the latest gas/electric hybrid supercars throw down the gauntlet with some track-burning speed and excitement. The early tests of the Ferrari 296 GTB and Lamborghini Revuelto show that, with a little help from electrons, cars with roaring engines can still melt the asphalt … and blow their drivers’ minds. Though far apart from each other in price, the Ferrari and Lambo make the same emphatic point about the still-thrilling potential available from cars with pistons and pipes.

Silver Corvette E-Ray on country road, top front view.

The Corvette is going electric! This fall, customers start taking delivery of the quickest Corvette ever, the E-Ray hybrid. Combining combustion and electric power, the E-Ray is designed to deliver the ultimate street Corvette experience. Just as the 2020 mid-engine Sting Ray realized a Corvette layout first promised more than 50 years ago, the E-Ray’s all-wheel drive delivers on legendary Corvette engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov’s vision and experiments with all-wheel grip for the Vette even before that. The E-Ray is available in coupe and convertible models, starting around $105,000. A full electro-Vette is in the pipeline, too.