Purchasing a Porsche?

Image Source: 1962 Porsche 356 (M.Furman)

Image Source: 1962 Porsche 356 (M.Furman)

Premier Loves Leasing Porsches

There are some Porsche collectors that like to fill their garages with only the marque’s vehicles. With a model range that includes sports cars, SUVs and luxury sedans, that’s an entirely plausible approach to covering all one’s automotive needs and desires. It seems to work for Jerry Seinfeld, perhaps the world’s most recognizable Porsche collector. Premier Financial Services could help you do the same.

Should you wish to lease one of the 25 variants of the current Porsche 911 including the GT3 RS, a 918 Spyder or prefer something vintage, such as a 1973 911 Carrera RS 2.7 or a 1964 904 Carrera GTS, PFS can assist you. Whether the Porsche you want is offered at an auction or by a private seller, in the U.S. or abroad, Premier has the resources to help you get a car appraised, purchased for lease and even shipped to your home.

 

Image Source: Porsche 1898 Egger-Lohner-Phaeton (www.gizmodo.com.au)

Image Source: Porsche 1898 Egger-Lohner-Phaeton (www.gizmodo.com.au)

From the Humblest Roots

If there are bragging points for humblest beginnings for a sports car, then Porsche wins. Ferdinand Porsche could count the world’s first gas-electric hybrid, the 1901 Lohner-Porsche, and the Auto Union grand prix race cars among his engineering masterpieces. But it was the lowly Volkswagen Type 1 – a.k.a. Beetle — that brought Porsche’s engineering to the masses after WWII, and it was that same lowly VW that provided building blocks for the first Porsche sports car, the 356. From that arose a sports car and racing dynasty without parallel.

Though the first Porsches mustered only 40 horsepower from their rear-mounted VW-based air-cooled engines, low weight and superb aerodynamics enabled a top speed of 80 mph. Not surprisingly, racing figured prominently in Porsche’s operation from the start. Rapid, relentless development and improvement became a Porsche signature. Power steadily climbed, and so did sales. Porsche built its 5,000th 356 in 1951.

The first of Porsche’s many legendary race cars, the mid-engine 550 Spyder, arrived in 1953 and became a “giant killer” by taking on much heavier machinery from Aston Martin, Ferrari, Jaguar and others. Despite a stellar race record, the 550 Spyder is more often linked to the crash that killed actor and race driver James Dean in early fall 1955.

Image Source: James Dean Porsche 550 Spyder (www.selvedgeyard.com)

Image Source: James Dean Porsche 550 Spyder (www.selvedgeyard.com)

The 911 Dynasty

Porsche’s racing DNA carried into its road cars, including the stripped-down 356 Speedster that has since become one of the most collectible of all early Porsches.

The 356 lasted 17 years, but if anyone thought an rear-mounted air-cooled engine was archaic for a sports car, Porsche had news: the configuration would continue, but now with six cylinders for its successor, the 911. Rally drivers loved the fast, oversteering 911, and rally wins were among the first in an ongoing run of competition successes.

Image Source: 1965 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS (rmauctions.com)

Image Source: 1965 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS (rmauctions.com)

Around the 911’s debut, Porsche began a concerted effort in endurance racing with the 904 Carrera GTS. The line of development would lead to the formidable 917, which gave Porsche its first of 17 Le Mans victories – the most of any marque, with the most recent in 2015. Another uber-cool actor and race driver, Steve McQueen, drove Porsches in the 1971 movie “Le Mans” and also in private life.

The Porsche 911 became the defacto gotta-have-it European sports car with the 911 S offering 140-mph performance to those who could handle it and the Targa becoming a trendsetter. As performance cars declined under malaise of primitive 1970s emissions controls, Porsche unleashed its antidote, the 911 Turbo Carrera. In U.S.-certified guise, the 911 Turbo could knock 0-60 down in about five seconds – astounding for the day and still impressive 40 years later. (The last car that McQueen special-ordered was a slate gray 1976 Turbo.)

 

Image Source: Steve McQueen Porsche 911s (porscheworld.net)

Image Source: Steve McQueen Porsche 911s (porscheworld.net)

Those ’70s Cars

Collaboration with VW resulted in the mid-engine 914, and then the 924, originally meant to be a VW sports coupe. Though some Porsche purists view the foray into front engine sports cars as a diversion, the 944 and 968 were excellent performers, and the V-8 928 was always considered one of the world’s finest GTs, a fact that may be under-appreciated today. (Admit it: when you think of the 928, you think of Tom Cruise fleeing Guido the pimp in the 1983 movie “Risky Business.”)

 

Image source: 1989 Porsche 928 (lamiapassione-p.blogspot.com)

Image source: 1989 Porsche 928 (lamiapassione-p.blogspot.com)

Supercar Cred

Porsche recovered from a 1980s slump by refocusing on the 911. How far could Porsche take the basic concept? The 1986 959 supercar answered with all-wheel drive, a 444-hp engine, 195 mph top speed and advanced lightweight construction. The 959 presaged all-wheel drive for the 911 Carrera and Turbo, along with the switch to liquid cooling in the late 1990s. Bill Gates bought a 959, though he waited more than a decade for it to clear customs, since it was not officially imported to the U.S. The 959 now is legal to import to the U.S. and there is one on lease in the PFS portfolio.

Many owners still drive their 911s hard, on road and track. With vintage 911 values following an upward trajectory, getting to know the experts at Premier Financial Services should be the first move toward acquiring one.

 

Image Source: 2005 Porsche Carrera GT (FlatFixes.com)

Image Source: 2005 Porsche Carrera GT (FlatFixes.com)

Back in Black

Porsche shifted into full resurgence mode with the mid-engine Boxster in 1997, then doubled down on the 911 and eventually gave the Boxster a coupe companion, the Cayman. In between, it did the completely unpredictable, debuting the Cayenne sport-utility and then the V-10, mid-engine Carrera GT supercar which Premier has been leasing since their inception in 2004.

The Cayenne expanded the marque’s reach and opened the door for the Panamera sedan and then the smaller Macan SUV. Sports car development continued full-throttle, and Porsche pulled a page from Ferrari’s playbook by limiting production of its 887-horsepower 918 Spyder hybrid supercar to 918 cars. If you did not join Jay Leno and AC/DC singer Brian Johnson on the owner roster, take heart: PFS has leased the 918 Spyder, too.

 

Image Source: Porsche 918 Spyder (press-porsche.com)

Image Source: Porsche 918 Spyder (press-porsche.com)

Leasing a Porsche with Premier’s Simple Lease

When you’re ready to drive home that new, late-model or classic Porsche and add it to your collection, your first call should be to Premier Financial Services. Premier has written hundreds of Porsche leases and has worked with Porsche dealers across the country. Our portfolio has included some great vintage and unique models. Here’s a sampling of models leased through Premier Financial Services:

Current & Contemporary Porschde

Vintage & Classic Porsche

2016 911 GT3 RS 1952 Glockler
2016 Cayman GT4 1956 550 1500 RS Spyder
2015 918 Spyder 1957 356 A Speedster GS
2015 Macan Turbo 1957 Carrera Speedster
2014 911 Turbo S 1961 Carrera 1600 GT Coupe
2014 Panamera 1961 356B Super 90 GT
2013 Cayenne GTS 1963 356/C Carrera 2000 GS
2012 911 Turbo S Cabriolet 1964 904 Carrera GTS
2011 GT3 Cup Car 1967 911S
2010 C4S 1970 914/6
2008 Boxster S 1971 911 Targa
2007 911 GT3 RS 1973 911 RS 2.7
2005 Carrera GT 1976 930 Turbo
1996 993 Twin Turbo 1976 934 Turbo RSR
1990 928 1977 911 Turbo
1989 911 Speedster 1978 935
1989 911 RUF Yellow Bird 1980 Porsche 911 SC
1988 959
1987 Carrera Turbo Slantnose
1986 930 Turbo
1984 953 Paris Dakar
1981 Porsche 935 K4

 

Image Source: 2015 Porsche 911 GT3RS (hdcarwallpapers.com)

Image Source: 2015 Porsche 911 GT3RS (hdcarwallpapers.com)